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20120925
20121003
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what he's going to do, john. reagan came into the debate with a caricature, an out-of- touch old geezer with 1930s values and views, cowboy, not very knowledgeable, and he knocked that dead by his appearance and the way he handled himself. romney comes in and is similarly caricatured partly because of his own mistakes and partly because of what democrats said about him, partly because of the merciless attacks from the media on him. so he's got to be a fighter, someone who's competent, tough and takes the measure of barack obama and says look, we can't take four more years of this and here's where we're going. if he comes in there tough and competent and destroys that caricature, i think he can still wake up this country, and i think there's still a chance he can turn it around. he's got to win it, though, john. >> obama's campaign staff is telling everybody it sees how good romney is at debating. >> well, each of the campaigns sent out a memo basically saying how good the other guy is and stressing all of their guy's flaws. ironically, they are right. both of talented debaters. obama ha
speed record. john acquire -- john mcguire reports. >> this is no milk float. nick haunting is at the wheel of a vehicle that may not sound like a super car, but certainly behaves like one. the speed on the first leg tops 145. nick, this is john, go, go, go. and on the return mile, he goes even faster, setting a new record of 140 miles per hour. they have done it, have they? they have done it? yes, they have done it. congratulations, you have broken the record. >> but what is it like to drive? >> it is very different. it is phenomenally quick. it feels different to any racing car or road car that i have driven. the acceleration is phenomenal. it is probably one of the quickest cars are driven. it is quicker than a be-while for raleigh. -- a v-12 ferrari. >> the company behind it, ec otricity is a clean energy firm and wants to challenge the concept that all grain cars are slow. >> they are not the kinds of things that normally, he would drive. they are super cars. they are as good as anything else on the road today. >> we brit have long harbored a the previous record, set b
" in the northern arabian sea. vice admiral john miller commands american naval forces in the middle east. >> there are elements of the exercise that cover maritime security operations. there are elements of the exercise that cover our ability to protect our ships from aviation assets, as well as sea- borne assets, and we are going to have a great opportunity to understand how all of it works. >> reporter: but these types of so-called "maritime security operations" could easily morph into full-blown war, according to alireza nader of the rand corporation. >> there's high potential for escalation between the united states and iran. if iran mines the strait of hormuz, then the united states would have to clear it. but to do so, the u.s. has to also consider iran's other military assets-- for example, air defense. and once you start hitting these, then a full scale war can erupt. i have a hard time imagining very limited iranian action in the strait of hormuz and a limited u.s. reaction to it. >> reporter: in a real-world situation, the u.s. would not allow the iranians to get so far as to p
, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org." anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >>> welcome, to a story that's been unfolding for nearly 40 years, but has gone largely untold. that's the way the central characters wanted it. they were smart and understood something very important, that they might more easily get what they wanted from state capitals than from washington, dc. so they started putting their money in places like r
the overall race. i do not think sarah palin helped john mccain, but i do not think anyone he picked held that election. people are going to vote for the person who is going to be president of the united states. can the vice president held? yes, but i think we overblow it, thinking it is going to alter the broad base. -- broad base. tavis: what is your sense of whether there is an international issue that might change this race? >> i always say if something they have been in existence, and you live with that uncertainty. that being said, i do not think that winds up being a new issue for most voters. i would say if you look at previous elections, a foreign- policy rises to the back burner issue. only times of relative domestic tranquillity as the economy seem to be doing well. other times foreign policy does not make it to the back burner. doesn't matter a little biscuits? sure, but i think this election is about the economy first, the economy second, the economy third, and anything else to be honest. tavis: good to have you on the show. thanks for your work. >> it is always a pleasure. t
series "politics and the pits" with erika miller and oil trader john netto, president of m-3 capital. tomorrow, we continue "politics >> how are traders in general viewing the election? >> well, the election is opinions aside, and no entity. obama is ahead. all the polls in the key states, the battleground states, obama has a lead as well. the markets discounted an obama win, and as a result, this bullish for risk, and for oil as well. >> how high do you continuing crude could go? >> i think $96, $97. not because of an obama victory, but because of bifurcation economically around the world. oi. the split side, what happen fist we can have a romney victory. >> i think oil rallies in either case. if romney wins, it rallies more, because romney victory is risk conducive which would send oil higher. >> ho how big is the uncertaint? >> much less than a few months ago. the morkt has begun to sdounlt an obama victory. not because of political uncertainty, but more because of economic certains. >> once we get beyond the election, what will be the driver for crude? >> economic growth, hands d
. >> i do. i did two movies this year. >> rose: did you? what did you do? >> i wrote a movie with john kuzinsky from the office, the promised land. >> rose: what is that? >> i am very proud of it the, gus van zandt directed it a salesman that goes to upstate new york and it is really just a movie about this little town and how the town changes him and how he is kind of changed by the town and he is selling and up there selling natural gas and in this kind of depressed rural community and just basically about kind of what happens. and it is about people. >> rose: and you wrote it? >> yeah. >> with john. with john crznyskk. >> and did a movie with soderberg. >> and you, a movie about liberace. >> we just finished filming two weeks ago. >> rose: does it feel good. i think it is going to be terrific, it is going to come out next may, but all of the signs -- i have done enough of these things i know when -- >> rose: can you really tell? i mean -- >> you know when you are in good shape, definitely. >> rose: definitely. we don't know if they will edit it right but you know -- >> soderberg ed
, georgia congressman and civil rights icon john lewis compared some voter i.d. statutes to literacy tests and poll taxes that kept blacks from voting for years in the south. >> i've seen this before. i lived this before. too many people struggled, suffered, and died to make this possible for every american to exercise their right to vote. ( applause ) >> suarez: nationwide pennsylvania is now one of 33 states with voter identification laws. it's one of five states with strict photo i.d. laws. the statutes have spawnd at least 15 legal challenges over everything from voter i.d. to early voting to culling voter rolls. in florida, the state republican party has filed a fraud complaint against the company it hired to register voters. as of friday at least 10 counties have spotted possibly fraudulent forms turned in by the firm. back in pennsylvania another eye peel to the state supreme court remains possible. in the meantime, the new rules have already been modified, prompting new coalitions to form with the aim of helping voters navigate the confusion. for more on how voter i.d. for more on
the debates, but george w. bush exceeded his expectations and did fine. four years later, john kerry at least in some of the eyes probably was a better debater but didn't necessarily matter. chuck is right, it is difficult to reset it. but there are a lot of voters who are completely fine with a new president, i think, even some people who voted for president obama. i was talking to a voter a week ago in wisconsin and said he voted for obama four years ago and not sure at all. he is open to voting for governor romney if he knew what he stood for. that is governor romney's charge here to put some meat on the bones of what he stands for on his policies. and people are open to that. >> jim, imagine yourself as a debate moderator this week and put on your mask and go with it. what kind of questions would you like to see these candidates address that will actually speak to the concerns you hear voters have about the future of this country? >> there is one question and i don't want to tell jim what to do but ask it different ways, and that is how in the world what you are proposing enough to get th
. it led to riots so severe president john f. kennedy sent in the national guard to restore order. so 50 years long, how have things changed in america? >> i came back to mississippi in 1960 to launch a war against white supremacy with the intent of destroying it. the color line didn't enter the picture. only citizenship. and the rights and privileges there are and the reality of enjoying them or not enjoying them. and that's the reason why i looked the way i did because i knew the other side of fear that if someone was in the situation where they were afraid and showed no fear it would scare the life out of the other side and i know it was for rear because they were shaking like a leaf on a tree. my job was finished. once i put the president of the united states in the position where he had to use the military might of the united states of america to protect my rights as a citizen, everything else was somebody else's job. i was not a human being. i was a soldier. and soldiers when they go to war, what soldiers do is kill enemies. of course a soldier must at all times be ready to die for
in the fuse. >> reporter: ministry volunteer john franklin practices what he preaches. whether he's employd, as he was at the time of this july taping, running training sessions for the state department or unemployed as he was soon after, he is always looking for a job. >> because that's the nature of the job market today. if you get laid off today from a position, it could take you anywhere from nine months to two years to find another job. those lay-offs can come at any time. your phone could ring and someone could say, "we're very sorry. please pack up your things." someone will walk you out the door. i've gone through that. 0 minutes later i was out on the streets just like you see in the movies. >> reporter: you would think that with help wanted ads moving from print to the internet job searching would be easier these days but no says john franklin. it's making things harder. >> lot of people come in here with all the on-line ads, they've put dates on them and notes. they haven't heard anything back. i honestly think if you're going to be spending the bulk of your time at home doing no
the enthusiasm of these obama volunteers, national surveys of young voters show a more complex picture. john della volpe is director of polling for harvard's institute of politics. >> it's almost night and day judy. you know whereas young people four years ago were among the most enthusiastic members of the electorate. we see major dissatisfaction with the process, with the campaign and far less political engagement than we've seen four years before. >> woodruff: hoping to capitalize on that dissatisfaction, mitt romney's campaign is using new targeted smart phone applications in an effort to pull young voters toward their candidate. 21-year-old o.s.u. senior niraj antani says it's working. >> i've had people come up to me who joined college republicans who say, "listen you know i fell into the hope and change trick in 2008 and we've seen his record and we want jobs when we graduate from college and so you know we are considering voting for governor romney." >> woodruff: at last weekend's game, young fans of ohio state university's beloved buckeyes had football, not politics, on their minds.
. >> there were countless trips in and out of johns hopkins. while i'm taking care of him i'm also still taking my mom to and from her doctors' appointments. in the meantime, in many respects it net like dad just wasn't getting better but i couldn't admit it. >> ear all in here. sreenivasan: today georgia's care is paid for by both medicaid and medicare. matthew's medicaid application ipending but both of them had to spend just about everything they saved to be poor enough to qualify for medicaid. after paying for prescriptions and other medical expenses each month they keep just $74 of the check they get from social security and veterans and retirement benefits. the rest goes to the nursing home. >> i had to dump all my stock. i had to dump my life insurance policy, her life insurance policy had to be dumped. they kept money out which we could to arrange for our funeral. a gravesite. the rest of the money we turned over -- i'm not complaining that's the way the game is. but now we're totally dependent on medicaid. >> sreenivasan: their story is all too familiar, according to matt. >> anyone of us
the concept of the european union in the late 40s and 50s, john monet. >> rose: a frenchman. >> said that the integration of europe will grow through crisis. and he was very right. also in that respect. because you see, when we have a serious crisis like undoubtedly the euro zone crise has been, you either accept the distraction-- this integrate ofigration, in the case of europe-- or you cope with the need to put things straight after they risk falling apart. and what is needed to have more cohesion. what is needed is each individual country and their political systems is ready to give up a bit of national sovereignty and to share that sovereignty with others-- that is, putting together a more integrated europe to be very concrete, big cause of the crisis was, of course, that some countries were running disorderly budget deficits. now, it has been-- and this has been also the root of the greek crisis, for example-- now, to cope with this, it has been decided that each and every government now has to submit it's craft budget for the following year, not to its domestic parliament first
barack obama lost by 19 points to john mccain. whether you carry a swing state or not depends more than whether you carry a town or not. it's cheaper to advertise in colorado springs than it is in a place by denver. losing by five fewer points in colorado springs is as useful to barack obama as winning by five more points in denver. >> ifill: you're spending time on the ground in colorado springs. you're taking like water from a fire hose. you're taking the intake here. what do voters who live there who are getting this kind of assault, what do they say? >> they hate it. i spoke to a romney volunteer who phone banks. he's he makes more than 300 calls. he's happy to call a home during the dinner hour but he's driven nuts by these ads. you can't stand watching them. the ads are not designed for him. something close to 95% of voters have made up their mind. the ads are designed for the 5% or so of voters who are still undecided. if you can get all but 5% of people to throw their remote control to the tv screen and the 5% pay attention and you win them over that may be worth the millions of
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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